Manuel Campos (Departament de Lògica, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain)

The term “information” has an obvious ordinary use: from information we obtain in our interaction with the world, we are capable of acquiring knowledge about it. Assuming a realist point of view, information thus interpreted (measurable in propositional terms) is acquired by the subject through inductive fallible processes based, in part, on the recognition of natural correlations. This approach to the notion of information has, however, as a counterpart, that it seems to render the notion redundant.

  • Full article published in Triple C, 7(2), special issue What is really information?
  • Spanish article published in ¿Qué es información?, 2008
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Antonio Florio (Institute for Logic, Cognition, Language and Information, University of Basque Country, UPV-EHU, Spain)

After a concise introduction on the analysis of truth and meaning in philosophy of language, two notions of information are grasped by the analysis of Situation Semantics and Situation Theory. The first is that of correlation, the second that of constraint; the latter is reducible to the former. More than that, the phenomenon of “alethic nature of information” is highlighted and the notion of “being informative” is pointed out. The difference between a meaning-oriented and an informational-oriented perspective of language is marked. Messages are recognized as being the atomic constituents of the informational perspective of language; the architecture of language is shown; and a praxiological-information perspective on the study of language is outlined.

  • Full article published in Triple C, 7(2), special issue What is really information?

Anto FLORIO (Universidad del País Vasco)

After a concise introduction about the idea of correspondence and correlation, in the first part of the paper two notions of information are grasped by the analysis of Situations Semantic and Situation Theory. The first is that of correlation, the second that of constraint; the latter is reducible to the former. More than that, the phenomenon of “alethic nature of information” is highlighted, a clear concept of information is gained and the nutshell of any possible “informational theory of truth” is point out. In the second part, an informational epistemological synthesis and lecture of language is propounded. The difference between a meaning-oriented language and an informational-oriented language is outlined and ‘messages’ are recognized as being the atomic constituents of language. In the conclusion the attention is focused on naturalized epistemology of information and language.

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